History

Mountain View Cemetery was established November 8, 1890, a full year before the town of Slaughter was incorporated as a 4th class town. (The name was changed to Auburn in 1893). At the instigation of social societies, including Independent Order of Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias, the Mountain View Cemetery Association was formed for the purpose of purchasing land well removed from White River’s annual floods, which were damaging Slaughter Precinct Cemetery.

Forty acres of land was purchased from Daniel Starr, and 92 Citizens contributed $25 each for bonds which allowed them plot space and trusteeships.

During the Depression Era, the cemetery suffered due to a lack of water. In 1945, a group of businessmen formed the Thousand One Club; their first act for community betterment was a move to transfer the cemetery to the City of Auburn.

This was completed in 1946 and the name was changed to Auburn City Cemetery. The following year county owned acreage adjoining the cemetery was purchased. The cemetery was endowed for the perpetual care January 1947. On June 6, 1967, the cemetery board formally voted to change back to Mountain View Cemetery.

Pioneer Cemetery

Pioneer Cemetery located at 8th NE and Auburn Way North, near Fred Meyer, is also part of the City of Auburn cemetery system. The land was donated in 1878 to the town of Slaughter, Washington territory, for a cemetery. Because of its small size and spring flooding, it was only active for about 20 years. In 1917, land on the east edge of the property was given to the Buddhist Church at Christopher, for use by the Japanese community.

Today, burials at Pioneer Cemetery are rare, as only cremated remains of descendants who were originally interred there are eligible. There is at least one civil war veteran interred here as well as a relative of Chief Sealth and other early Auburn pioneers. The grounds at this historical site are under the care of the Auburn Parks and Recreation Department. This is also the site of one of the many pieces of Public Artwork that can be found throughout Auburn.